TV's best new dramas seem old ("Magnum") and new ("The Rookie")


Yes, there are some good TV dramas this fall. Many critics dislike the new "Magnum," but I think it's terrific; most like "The Rookie." Here's the drama round-up I sent to papers, as part of a six-part season preview. To find the mainbar, scroll up; to find the others, starting with sci-fi and fantasy, scroll down. 

By Mike Hughes

Television still
likes the drama of daily life ... as long as those lives include
cops, crooks or wobbly psyches.

The new season has
lots of variations on crime shows, plus a few looks at love (true or
twisted) and life. Here's a look at what's new:

 

The best

-- “The Rookie”
(10 p.m. Tuesdays, ABC, Oct. 16). At 40, John has a heroic moment ...
then makes a big move: He dumps his comfortably unexceptional life
and becomes a Los Angeles cop. With Nathan Fillion, 47, starring,
this is the rare show that has it all – large bits of drama, small
bits of humor, occasional action ... and some stories that are
wrapped up by the end of the hour.

-- “Magnum P.I.”
(9 p.m. Mondays, CBS, Sept. 24). Yes, plenty of critics have grumbled
about the show and the obvious fact that Jay Hernandez is no Tom
Selleck. He's seven-and-a-half inches shorter and, by our
calculation, only 58 percent as handsome. Let's set that aside,
though; Hernandez is good and the show is terrific. Slick and sleek,
it has Magnum and his former war buddies racing around the Hawaiian
sunshine, thwarting bad guys,. Perdita Weeks is a great addition as a
very different Higgins.

The rest

-- “Mayans MC”
(10 p.m. Tuesdays, FX, started Sept. 5). Almost four years after
“Sons of Anarchy” ended, fans finally have this spin-off. In the
first two episodes, we've learned that the two brothers have had big
secrets. One is a member of the tough motorcycle club; the other, an
ex-con, is just starting. The result is intense, brutal and often
compelling.

-- “You” (10
p.m. Sundays, Lifetime, started Sept. 9). Smartly written and
beautifully filmed, this at first seems like the best love story ever
... then quickly settles for being one of the best stalker stories.
There's great work from director Lee Krieger and his stars, Penn
Badgely and Elizabeth Lail.

-- “A Million
Little Things” (10 p.m. Wednesdays, ABC, Sept. 26). Think of this
as “This Is Us” without the family ties. Four guys are
hockey-game buddies, bringing their wives and loves into the
friendship. Then something happens that makes them question
everything. The result has substance, depth ... and, alas, lots of
lingering questions.

-- “FBI” (9 p.m.
Tuesdays, CBS, Sept. 25). TV has tried the FBI before, but not like
this. Now the stakes are higher, the technical abilities are steeper
... and the show has a female star. That's Missy Peregrym, who was
terrific if “Rookie Blue” and others; here, she's confined to a
one-note character in a show that – like most from producer Dick
Wolf – sometimes feels flat and stiff.

-- “New Amsterdam”
(10 p.m. Tuesdays, NBC, Sept. 25). The setting is a mega-hospital,
one that's been in New York almost forever. A new medical director
(Ryan Eggold of “The Blacklist”) makes sweeping changes ...
including firing an entire department. That's a bit abrupt, but there
are signs this could evolve into a solid show.

-- “All American”
(9 p.m. Wednesdays, CW, Oct. 10). Growing up in a tough neighborhood,
Spencer has one way out: He's a football star ... and an ambitious
coach (Taye Diggs) can get him a transfer to a glitzy Beverly Hills
High School. An interesting, culture-clash tale, this is partly based
on a true story ... but some of the soap-style twists strain its
credibility.

The enigmas

-- “Kidding” (10
p.m. Sundays, Showtime, started Sept. 9). Jim Carrey is superb as a
caring kid-show host whose life – and, maybe, mind – crumbled
after his son's death. But despite some good moments, the show
becomes a monotone, pushing him deeper into despair.

-- “Mr. Inbetween”
(11 p.m. Tuesdays, FX, Sept. 25). Back in 2005, this was a
micro-budget Australian movie, seen by approximately no one, not even
Australians. Now it's a TV series ... and an oddly charming one,
about a guy balancing his worlds as good dad and a calm hitman. One
scene – involving his daughter's legends, from Santa to unicorns –
is a classic.

And more

There are lots more
shows out there, including several we haven't seen yet. Some top
examples:

-- “The Good Cop”
(Sept. 21, Netflix). With “Monk,” writer-producer Andy Breckman
proved that a crime-of-the-week drama could also have humor and
heart. Now he has Josh Groban as a straight-arrow cop whose dad (Tony
Danza) is an ex-cop, used to bending the rules.

-- “Wanderlust”
(Oct. 19, Netflix). Toni Collette is a psychologist who – after a
near-death experience -- decides to broaden her life.

-- “Homecoming”
(Nov. 2, Amazon Prime). Two great talents – Julia Roberts ad “Mr.
Robot” creator Sam Esmail – combine, in a story of bureaucracy
gone bad. A sampling is compelling.

-- “Little Drummer
Girl” (starts Nov. 19, AMC). After winning praise and awards with
“The Night Manager,” AMC has another John LeCarre novel. This one
– which was a 1984 Diane Keaton movie – has an actress (Florence
Pugh) pulled into intrigue by an Israeli spy (Alexander Skarsgard).