TV dramas? The quanity is great, quality is (maybe) OK


(This wraps up a six-part
package I sent to papers, previewing the new TV season. This one views the dramas; scroll down and you'll find two overviews, plus round-up of sci-fi, military and comedy shows.)

By Mike Hughes

The one thing TV has
in abundance this season – and most seasons – is drama.

Cable loves drama
hours; broadcast networks sort of like them. No longer confined to 22
separate stories a year, they can have varied lengths and ongoing
plots. Here's what's new this fall:

THE BEST

-- “The Good
Doctor,” ABC. After “Bates Motel” ended, Freddie Highmore
didn't have to move far. He's still on Mondays and still playing a
pensive guy. Now he's a surgeon whose skill is concealed by youth and
autism. This sometimes feels contrived, but it's led by David Shore,
whose “House” showed he's good with medical stories and troubled
doctors. (10 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 25)

-- “Top of the
Lake,” Sundance. Here's a fine way to start the season – a
three-night mini-series that's complex and compelling. Elisabeth Moss
returns as an Australian cop; Jane Campion (“The Piano”) co-wrote
it, directed it and got great work from two of her favorites: Alice
Englert (her real-life daughter) plays a combative teen-ager; Nicole
Kidman plays the girl's distant stepmother. (9-11 p.m. Sept. 10-12)

QUITE GOOD

-- “Ten Days in
the Valley,” ABC. Jane (Kyra Sedgwick) has awards, a top job
(writing and producing a TV cop show), a nice home and a sweet
daughter. But she's also divorced, overworked, given to propping
herself up with drugs. Then tragedy strikes. That starts a 10-part
mini-series that seems exaggerated at times, but tells an engrossing
story through a gifted actress. (10 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 1)

-- “The Deuce”
(HBO). Back in the 1970s, Times Square was crumbling. There, we meet
an ambitious bartender and his no-account brother (both played by
James Franco); we also meet an independent prostitute (Maggie
Gyllenhaal), a brainy co-ed and more. And we see the start of the new
porn-film world. The result is richly crafted and detailed. (9 p.m.
Sundays, Sept. 10).

THE REST (broadcast
networks)

-- “Kevin
(Probably) Saves the World,” ABC. Kevin (Jason Ritter) has failed
at everything, including a suicide attempt. His sister (JoAnna Garcia
Swisher) is a top scientist, widowed, with a somber, teen daughter.
Now they merge ... just as he learns he's one of God's chosen ones.
It's tough to tell where this is going; so far it's sometimes saved
by Ritter's floundering charm. (10 p.m. Tuesdays, Oct. 3).

-- “Dynasty”
(CW). A long-ago hit is remade, cranking up the antagonism. The
sweet-spirited Krystle becomes the conniving Cristal. Her niece
Sammy Jo is now her gay, male cousin. Alexis isn't here yet, but
Fallon is; she's eager to be a mogul. This is big and exaggerated ...
but not as much fun as the original,. 9 p.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 11).

-- “Wisdom of the
Crowd” (CBS). Wouldn't it be great if tech moguls took over other
fields, filling them with slick screens? Networks thought so, anyway.
Last year, CBS' “Pure Genius” and Fox's “APB” failed quickly;
now “Wisdom” has the same flaws – lots of screens and computer
images, but little to get viewers to care. (8 p.m. Sundays, but the
Oct. 1 debut is set for 8:30)

-- ALSO: “Law &
Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders” (NBC) will spend eight
weeks re-creating the 1993-4 case, with Edie Falco as lawyer Leslie
Abramson. (10 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 26).

CABLE AND STREAMING

-- Two of the best
dramas opened in August. “Mr. Mercedes” is 8 p.m. Wednesdays on
DirecTV/AT&T. “Get Shorty” is 10 p.m. Sundays on Epix; on
Sept. 10, episodes 2 through 4 will rerun at 7:05.

-- Drama from
overseas? “Newton's Law” (arriving Sept. 11 on www.acorn.tv)
is a jaunty series about a lawyer who scrambles as her life wobbles.
“The Halcyon” (10 p.m. Mondays on Ovation, starting Oct. 2) is a
classy series set in an upscale British hotel in 1940. “Masterpiece:
The Collection: (10 p.m. Sundays, PBS, Oct. 8) is set in the fashion
world in post-war Paris.

-- On cable,
Showtime's “Liar” tells a complex story at 10 p.m. on six
Wednesdays, starting Sept. 27. In streaming, Amazon has “Tin Star”
on Sept. 29 and Netflix has a bunch -- “Mindhunter” (Oct. 13),
“Alias Grace” (Nov. 3), “Godless” (Nov. 22) and Spike Lee's
“She's Gotta Have It” (Nov. 23).