TV column for Monday, Jan. 15


TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
“Selma” (2015), 7 and 10 p.m., FX, and more.

Here is the perfect
movie for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, with a powerful portrait of
King's historic Alabama march. It won an Oscar for best song
(“Glory”) and was nominated for best-picture. The Golden Globes
also nominated director Ava DuVernay and star David Oyelowo.

Also at 7, the Oprah
Winfrey Network has the excellent “The Butler” (2013); both films
have Winfrey in support. And Turner Classic Movies includes “Sounder”
(1972) at 4 p.m. ET, Sidney Poitier's “Patch of Blue” (1965) and
“A Warm December” (1972) at 6 and 8 and “Daughters of the Dust”
(1991) at 10.

TONIGHT'S MIGHT-SEE:
“The Gifted,” 8-10 p.m., Fox.

In a worthy effort
to have fewer reruns, Fox has shows sharing timeslots. Next week,
this slot goes to “The Resident” (after its Sunday debut); first,
“Gifted” wraps its season with a two-hour burst.

Dr. Campbell (Garret
Dillahunt) attends an anti-mutant summit, hoping to take his program
national; the mutants try a dangerous mission to stop him. Meanwhile,
their own headquarters is attacked.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: “Independent Lens: I Am Not Your Negro,” 9-10:30
p.m., PBS.

In 1979, James
Baldwin – the brilliant novelist and essayist – described his new
book. It would be a personal account of the lives and deaths of
Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King. When he died eight
years later (at 63), however, he had finished only 30 pages.

Now filmmaker Raoul
Peck has, in a way, completed a film version of the book. He mixes
Baldwin's words (voiced by Samuel L. Jackson), with news footage and
more. The result – an Oscar-nominee for best documentary feature –
is beautifully crafted.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE II: NAACP Image Awards, 9 p.m., TV One, with red-carpet
at 8.

Anthony Anderson
hosts a star-stuffed night. Three movies -- “Get Out,” “Girls
Trip” and “Marshall” -- have five nominations apiece. They're
up for best film, alongside “Detroit” and “Roman J. Israel.”

Chadwick Boseman –
who plays Thurgood Marshall in “Marshall” -- is up for
entertainer of the year. He faces musicians Jay-Z, Bruno Mars and
Chance the Rapper, plus Issa Rae (the “Insecure” creator and
star) and Ava DuVernay, the “Queen Sugar” producer whose “Selma”
also airs tonight.

Other choices
include:

“The
Detectorists,” any time, www.acorn.tv.
Slow and droll (those are British traits) this is also fairly clever
(another British trait). It follows the lives of two chaps who spend
their spare time with metal detectors. Lance (Toby Jones) learns that
his favorite turf has been sold. Andy (Mackenzie Crook) and his wife
(Rachael Stirling) have financial trouble and must stay with her
mother (Diana Rigg, who is, indeed, Stirling's mother). The result is
fun, in its own quiet way.

“Supergirl,” 8
p.m., CW. Reign continues her rampage and Supergirl – in a
dreamlike state – can 't help. Mon-El asks Brainiac to retrieve
her; soon, the Legion of Superheroes arrives.

“Better Late Than
Never,” 9 p.m., NBC. In Barcelona, the guys range from lingering
lunches to tango dances. Terry Bradshaw and Henry Winkler also find
moments of nudity.

“Chain of
Command,” 9 p.m., National Geographic. Put this one under good
intentions. The idea is to show the lives of the key people (generals
and a few sergeants) who lead the military. The result? These people
seem steady and sturdy ... but not particularly interesting.

“Scorpion,” 10
p.m., CBS. Trapped inside a bunker, the team needs help from Tony's
ex-girlfriend and her husband, who is Toby's nemesis.

“The Good Doctor,”
10:01 p.m., ABC. Last week, Shaun skipped work and had a road trip
with his neighbor Lea. Now he's at the hospital – where the surgery
to separate twins falters – with a decision.