"Me So Horny" guy? Now he seems "Me So Nice"


You meet a lot of interesting people during Television Critics Association interviews, but few more interesting than Luther Campbell, the rapper turned youth-football patron. Here's the story I sent to papers:

By Mike Hughes

Luther Campbell was
grinning about one of life's odd twists.

“We're the
cleanest show in the room,” he said. “So this is a first for me.”

This was a
Television Critics Association session with the Starz network. A few
minutes earlier, another show (“Power”) had dealt with sex and
violence; now his show was talking about kids and football.

Back home in Miami,
Campbell said, people always knew him as a community/kids guy. “The
rest of the world saw me as the 'Me So Horny' man.”

Hey, it's a hard
image to shake. There was Campbell (as Uncle Luke) with his 2 Live
Crew colleagues, explaining: “Ah, me so horny/Ah, me so horny/Ah,
me so horny/Me love you long time.” He reportedly produced a porno
film, started an adult magazine, had six kids from five relationships
and was at the core of a rule-breaking scheme to pay University of
Miami football players.

Now the same guy
finances and leads a free program for Miami kids. It's sort of “Me
so nice.”

Campbell grew up in
the Liberty City area, which Starz's Carmi Zlotnik calls “a
dangerous neighborhood in Miami that is arguably the NFL's largest
and most successful football factory.”

He was a product of
that factory – a 160-pound high school linebacker, good enough to
improve his situation. “The only people who got bused to South
Beach (were blacks who could) play football.”

Campbell says he
wasn't a big star, but he was helpful. “I was a comedian .... I was
the one who cracked people up.” He would go on to be a DJ and then,
at 24, to be part of 2 Live Crew.

In 1989, the Crew
faced obscenity charges for the album that included “Horny” and
more. The group needed that boost, says the Rolling Stone
Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll (Fireside, 2005). After making
“otherwise unexceptional recordings for five years, (it gained)
national notoriety.”

Campbell was always
in court and in the news, eventually winning each case. He remained
in Miami and, he says, saw bigger issues. “Knock on the door, the
mom answers. There's a mattress and eight kids sleeping on that one
mattress. This (stuff) is real.”

He started the youth
football program and befriended many of the kids. “(Devonta)
Freeman is like our son” and sometimes lived with Campbell and his
wife. “We basically took him in ... at the age of 8.”

Now Freeman is a
young running back for the Falcons and has already had two 1,000-yard
seasons. Other Liberty City guys have thrived, including Lavonte
David (an all-pro linebacker for Tampa Bay) and Chad Johnson, a
Cincinnati Bengals great who caught 67 touchdown passes.

“In Chad's case
you could always tell he was going to be something,” Campbell said
... even when he was a young offensive lineman, not a receiver.

That success will
elude most kids, Campbell said, “but they'll have an opportunity to
get a college degree.” With that in mind, he expects progress
reports from school and a 2.5 grade point.

He's also expanded
the program to include girls – now there's basketball, dancing and
more – and life “When kids sign up, they bring in their parents,”
he said. “One of the things we ask is, 'Are you registered to
vote?'”

-- “Warriors of
Liberty City,” 8 p.m. Sundays, Starz, beginning Sept. 16

-- Opener reruns at
11 p.m. and 1:01 a.m.; then at 1:50 and 7 p.m. Monday; 6:20 and 9
p.m. Tuesday; 9:02 p.m. Friday (Sept. 21), 5:08 and 10:23 p.m.
Saturday, 11:48 a.m. Sept. 23